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England v Denmark: If you’re lucky you can still get a ticket, here’s how

Fans will be hoping to secure a seat at Wembley as the Three Lions aim to reach their first major tournament final since 1966.

 

Thousands of England fans will be hoping to secure tickets to what could be a historic semi-final at Wembley after the Three Lions defeated Ukraine in Rome on Saturday.

Gareth Southgate’s side will face Denmark on Wednesday as they aim to reach their first major tournament final since 1966.

Last month the government announced that the capacity at Wembley would rise to 60,000 for the semi-finals and final – but UEFA’s site shows that tickets available to the general public have sold out.

However there are a couple of routes to getting a ticket for the lucky few. Here we take a look at how Three Lions fans can purchase tickets for what could be one of the most significant matches in the history of English football.

Are tickets still available?

Yes, but to get them you will have to be “patient and determined”, say experts.

Matt Willis of Football Supporters Europe told Sky News: “Demand is through the roof.

“Especially with reduced capacity of 60,000 instead of 90,000, demand is obviously very high.”

Around 8,500 new tickets have been earmarked for England supporters who follow the national team at home and abroad, while 5,000 have been allocated for Danish fans.

A tiny number of tickets will still be made available via the UEFA ticket portal, although it’s unknown when they are released, possibly as soon as Monday, but more likely Tuesday.

Mr Willis advised: “You have got to be patient and determined with the UEFA portal. Don’t give up. Keep going.

“That portal is there and it’s active. Tickets drop in and out of that portal as and when they are available.”

He added: “Everybody wants to be part of this opportunity and this game. It’s really gripping the nation.”

Is there any other way of securing tickets?

It’s a long shot but if you know a Ukrainian national living in the UK who had bought tickets hoping their team would be in the semi-final, it is possible for them to transfer them over, said Mr Willis.

Tickets are also reportedly being sold on reselling websites for thousands of pounds – despite UEFA’s bid to ban the resale of tickets for above face value.

Tickets for the Italy v Spain semi-final at Wembley are available and cost at least €345 (£296).

But Mr Willis advised against the black market and warned fans to be careful about where they buy their tickets.

Where else can you watch the match?

The game will be broadcast on ITV, kicking off at 8pm.

Can Danish fans travel here?

Denmark is currently on the UK’s amber list which means that those currently in Denmark will not be able to attend the game.

The rules surrounding amber countries mean people arriving into England must quarantine at home for 10 days and take COVID tests twice while in isolation.

Those looking to use the government’s Test to Release scheme to leave quarantine earlier are also out of luck, as tests have to be taken on day five after arrival in the UK.

What about Danes living in the UK?

The Danish FA has said its allocation of 5,000 tickets to the game will be sold to Danes living in the UK, adding: “DB has sent national team jerseys and flags to Wembley to Danes living in England, so they can be well dressed for the semi-finals.”

What about the other semi-final?

Italy and Spain will play each other in the other semi-final, also to be held at Wembley.

Both countries are on the amber list, although the Balearic Islands in Spain are on the green watchlist meaning travellers from there could enter England if they take a COVID test on or before day two after they arrive and only have to quarantine if it is positive.

The Italian FA said its allocation of 6,400 tickets will be sold to fans living in the UK or Ireland.

What about the final?

The arrangement for the final is different with supporters of countries not on the green list allowed to travel subject to strict restrictions.

There were suggestions UEFA, European football’s ruling body, was pushing for 2,500 guests to attend the competition’s final on July 11 without having to comply with the usual border restrictions.

According to the Danish FA, 1,000 fans from countries in the final – except England – can get into the stadium if they travel in a strict bubble, entering and leaving the country on the same day on a chartered aircraft.